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KEY STAGE TWO – Helping your child with reading

Asking children questions about what they have read is essential to ensure they become confident, fluent readers that are able to read age appropriate texts. Below are some suggested questions you can use when reading with your child. Pick 1, 2 or 3 questions each time you listen to your child read.

Give/explain the meaning of words in context

  • What does this… word/phrase/sentence… tell you about… character/setting/mood etc?
  • Highlight a key phrase or line
  • By writing a line in this way what effect has the author created?
  • In the story, 'x' is mentioned a lot. Why?
  • The writer uses words like … to describe …. What does this tell you about a character or setting? · What other words/phrases could the author have used?
  • The writer uses …words/phrases…to describe … How does this make you feel?
  • How has the writer made you and/or character feel …happy /sad/angry/ frustrated/lonely/bitter etc?

Information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction

  • Where does the story take place?
  • When did the story take place?
  • What did s/he/it look like?
  • Who was s/he/it?
  • Where did s/he/it live?
  • Who are the characters in the book?
  • Where in the book would you find…?
  • What do you think is happening here?
  • What happened in the story?
  • What might this mean?
  • Through whose eyes is the story told?
  • Which part of the story best describes the setting?
  • What words and /or phrases do this?
  • What part of the story do you like best?
  • What evidence do you have to justify your opinion?

Summarise main ideas from more than one paragraph

  • What’s the main point in this paragraph?
  • Can you sum up what happens in these three/four/five… paragraphs?
  • You’ve got ‘x’ words; sum up these paragraphs.
  • Sort the information in these paragraphs. Do any of them deal with the same information? · Make a table/chart to show the information in these paragraphs.
  • Which is the most important point in these paragraphs? How many times is it mentioned?

Make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from the text

  • What makes you think that?
  • Which words give you that impression?
  • How do you feel about…?
  • Can you explain why…?
  • I wonder what the writer intended?
  • I wonder why the writer decided to…?
  • What do these words mean and why do you think the author chose them?

Predict what might happen from details stated and implied.

  • Can you think of another story, which has a similar theme; e.g. good over evil; weak over strong; wise over foolish? Do you think this story will go the same way?
  • Do you know of another story which deals with the same issues; e.g. social; moral; cultural? Could this happen in this story?
  • Which other author handles time in this way; e.g. flashbacks; dreams?
  • Which stories have openings like this? Do you think this story will develop in the same way?
  • Why did the author choose this setting? Will that influence how the story develops?
  • How is character X like someone you know? Do you think they will react in the same way?

Identify/explain how information/narrative content is related and contributes tomeaning as a whole

  • Explain why a character did something.
  • Explain a character's different/changing feelings throughout a story. How do you know?
  • What are the clues that a character is liked/disliked/envied/feared/loved/hated etc…?
  • What is similar/different about two characters?
  • Why is 'x' (character/setting/event) important in the story?
  • What is the story (theme) underneath the story? Does this story have a moral or a message?
  • Why do you think the author chose to use a… question/bullet/subheading/table etc to present the information?
  • How does the title/layout encourage you to read on/find information?
  • Where does it tell you that…?
  • Why has the writer written/organised the text in this way?
  • In what ways do the illustrations support the instructions?
  • How could these instructions/information/illustrations be improved?
  • Who do you think this information is for?

Identify/explain how meaning is enhanced through choice of words and phrases

  • What does the word 'x' tell you about 'y'?
  • Find two or three ways that the writer tells you 'x'.
  • What does this… word/phrase/sentence… tell you about… character/setting/mood etc?
  • Highlight a key phrase or line. By writing a line in this way what effect has the author created?
  • In the story, 'x' is mentioned a lot. Why?
  • The writer uses words like … to describe …. What does this tell you about a character or setting? · What other words/phrases could the author have used?
  • The writer uses …words/phrases…to describe … How does this make you feel?
  • How has the writer made you and/or character feel …happy /sad/angry/ frustrated/lonely/bitter etc?
  • Has the writer been successful in their purpose or use of language?
  • What do you think the writer meant by… 'x'?
  • Which words do you think are most important? Why?
  • Which words do you like the best? Why?
  • The author makes an action/description 'like' something else. Why?
  • The author states that 'x' is something it isn't. What is the effect of this? Why have they done this?

Make comparisons within the text.

  • Describe different characters' reactions to the same event in a story.
  • How is it similar to …?
  • How is it different to …?
  • Is it as good as …?
  • Which is better and why?
  • Compare and contrast different character/settings/themes in the text
  • What do you think about the way information is organised in different parts of the text? Is there a reason for why this has been done?

 

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